The Science of Bass Drops!

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Edit April 3, 2014: Hey everyone! Hope no one minded our little April Fool’s joke. That said, we’d love to actually make this video. Who wants to do some research? (We do.)

In this video, we explore the science behind bass drops. Why are bass drops so popular in electronic music? Are we responding to pitch the same way cognitively as we do to dynamics? Join us as we explore just why bass drops are so popular. Is it the tension and release? Does it cognitively have to do with the way the pitch drops? Are we, in fact, evolutionarily inclined to love the bass? Or, at least, to respond to it.This video is best listened to on Beats headphones or the phattest sub you own. Please don’t use your Macbook speakers.

 

A shout out to producer Evan Scott for providing the music for this week’s episode. https://soundcloud.com/evanscottproducer

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The Science of Wikidrummer

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We’re back from spring break with a new video!

Drummer Julien Audigier and Audio Zéro put together the Wikidrummer video, an exploration of different environments and the effect these spaces had on drum sounds.

In this video, we break down the science behind why all of these spaces sound different. We’ll also show you our own reverb experiment, and how you can incorporate physical spaces into your music, even if it was recorded somewhere else.

Analog Vs. Digital: The Age-Old Question

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Can you really hear a difference between analog and digital recording? What about in synthesis? In a personified rap battle between analog and digital, who would win?

NYU students, having nothing better to do at our ivory tower of academia (I mean, it’s not like we live in one of America’s biggest commercial and cultural centers or anything) love contemplating age-old questions such as these. You may remember some freshmen who previously did ponder whether was better to auto-tune or to not auto-tune. And while these questions may prove inconclusive, the best part is, as always, in the debate.

 

 

So our freshmen rose to the occasion once again to bring forth this rousing performance; a call to arms for their fellow rap battlers. And a cry heard throughout the land did ring: Who won? Who lost? You decide!*

*No seriously, leave a comment below.

Wah Pedals: A Look “Under the Hood”

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Since their invention in 1966, wah pedals have had a prolific history in modern rock music. From Jimi Hendrix’s “Voodoo Child” to David Gilmour in “Echoes” (where it was used backwards). But what goes into a wah pedal? How does it get that distinctive, “cry baby” sound? Let’s get under the hood and find out.

Home Foley Experiment: Fight Scene

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Happy Thanksgiving from Science of Music!

We’ve got a new video project this week. Add some literal “punch” to your fight scenes by stealing some celery from the stuffing. Tell Mom it’s for SCIENCE. Or for ART? Whichever one will get you out of trouble with your relatives.

Foley is the art of adding sounds to a film to match the footage shown on screen. You’d be surprised to know that much of the sound you hear in movies is added in after the fact. In this video, we experimented with a simple fight scene you could recreate at home. There are also other sounds that you can create with celery: monster chomps and footsteps are a couple more examples. Create your own and let us know how you did it!

Introduction to Resistors

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In a continuation of our Introduction to Electronic Components series we present (drum roll please) resistors!

Resistors…resist. It’s what they do. Well, they don’t resist everything. They won’t help you resist the temptations of the dark side, for example. But these little guys are useful components when it comes to regulating the amount of electricity with which you want to work.

Interested in more? Check out our full playlist here.