Voltage Regulators: An Introduction

We finish off our Introduction to Electronic Components series with the voltage regulator, which is a useful little thing. Sometimes, you have more voltage than you need—say, when you’re working with a 9 volt battery but you need 5 volts for your circuit. Also, if your project is especially finicky, they can also take in a fluctuating amount of voltage and emit a perfectly constant value.

If you’re looking for more about other components (say…diodes, buttons and switches, resistors, etc etc) check out the whole playlist!

 

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Home Foley Experiment Part 2: Revenge of the Foley Experiment!

Wait…there was a part 1?

That’s right, we’re finally posting the second part of our at-home Foley extravaganza! Last Thanksgiving we put together a Very Special Episode about a Foley fight scene. Later, we returned to the subject and created dinosaur chomps out of that same sound! Of course Ronny crunching on some celery doesn’t have quite the same menacing quality that an on-screen, cretaceous bringer of doom and death properly deserves, so we’ll show you how to make your dino crunches sound big and scary.

 

Oh and since this video our friend has seen the error of his innocent finger-attacking ways and now lives peacefully in the NYU Studios.

a t rex named foley

The Science of Wikidrummer

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We’re back from spring break with a new video!

Drummer Julien Audigier and Audio Zéro put together the Wikidrummer video, an exploration of different environments and the effect these spaces had on drum sounds.

In this video, we break down the science behind why all of these spaces sound different. We’ll also show you our own reverb experiment, and how you can incorporate physical spaces into your music, even if it was recorded somewhere else.

Where Music, Education, and Technology Collide

We at the Science of Music are firmly perched on the intersection between music and technology, but we’re at a few other crossroads as well.

With technology changing the way we look at art (and vice versa) it’s only to be expected that it’s changing the way we look at education. We, in particular, are especially interested in the way technology is reshaping how we think of music education.

A new edition to NYU’s faculty in 2013, Alex Ruthmann also serves as the President of the Association of Technology in Music Education. We’re happy to have him at NYU, and especially happy to talk with him about the future of music education, why people should learn music, and what it means to be both an innovator and an educator. For more from Alex, you can find him on Twitter as @alexruthmann or visit him at his website.

Wah Pedals: A Look “Under the Hood”

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Since their invention in 1966, wah pedals have had a prolific history in modern rock music. From Jimi Hendrix’s “Voodoo Child” to David Gilmour in “Echoes” (where it was used backwards). But what goes into a wah pedal? How does it get that distinctive, “cry baby” sound? Let’s get under the hood and find out.