Where Music, Education, and Technology Collide

We at the Science of Music are firmly perched on the intersection between music and technology, but we’re at a few other crossroads as well.

With technology changing the way we look at art (and vice versa) it’s only to be expected that it’s changing the way we look at education. We, in particular, are especially interested in the way technology is reshaping how we think of music education.

A new edition to NYU’s faculty in 2013, Alex Ruthmann also serves as the President of the Association of Technology in Music Education. We’re happy to have him at NYU, and especially happy to talk with him about the future of music education, why people should learn music, and what it means to be both an innovator and an educator. For more from Alex, you can find him on Twitter as @alexruthmann or visit him at his website.

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Analog Vs. Digital: The Age-Old Question

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Can you really hear a difference between analog and digital recording? What about in synthesis? In a personified rap battle between analog and digital, who would win?

NYU students, having nothing better to do at our ivory tower of academia (I mean, it’s not like we live in one of America’s biggest commercial and cultural centers or anything) love contemplating age-old questions such as these. You may remember some freshmen who previously did ponder whether was better to auto-tune or to not auto-tune. And while these questions may prove inconclusive, the best part is, as always, in the debate.

 

 

So our freshmen rose to the occasion once again to bring forth this rousing performance; a call to arms for their fellow rap battlers. And a cry heard throughout the land did ring: Who won? Who lost? You decide!*

*No seriously, leave a comment below.

A Speaker From a Starbucks Cup?

Part of what we at the Science of Music love about DIY electronics is the tinkering aspect of it. It’s the idea that you can take an everyday object and just…flip the script a little bit to create something new entirely. That’s the spirit with which we present this video project.

We looked at a Starbucks cup and, with just some magnets, a coil of wire, some tape we saw how you could “flip the script” to create a working speaker. Plus, it’s a good excuse to get yourself a frappuccino*.

(*Note: not an action we recommend in January. Unless you’re close to or within the Southern Hemisphere. In which case: Hi, can we come visit?)

Home Foley Experiment: Fight Scene

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Happy Thanksgiving from Science of Music!

We’ve got a new video project this week. Add some literal “punch” to your fight scenes by stealing some celery from the stuffing. Tell Mom it’s for SCIENCE. Or for ART? Whichever one will get you out of trouble with your relatives.

Foley is the art of adding sounds to a film to match the footage shown on screen. You’d be surprised to know that much of the sound you hear in movies is added in after the fact. In this video, we experimented with a simple fight scene you could recreate at home. There are also other sounds that you can create with celery: monster chomps and footsteps are a couple more examples. Create your own and let us know how you did it!

The Science of Music Gets Its Own YouTube Channel!

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Hello Blogosphere!

These are your friendly music-to-science emissaries from NYU MARL announcing a new YouTube channel specifically for the Science of Music!

In this video we outline our ongoing mission is to bridge the world of music to engineering, science, and technology. And we also give you a preview for what’s to come, so tune in for a weekly demonstration or explanation from New York University’s Music and Audio Research Laboratory!

The Science of Music’s Secret Origin Story

The truth is, the Science of Music wasn’t always a blog. Or a YouTube channel. And it definitely didn’t start out as a Twitter or Facebook page.

I’ll give you a moment to stifle your gasps.

This project actually began in 2010 as an after school program. The four-part workshop was presented by NYU MARL’s Science of Music team at the Institute for Collaborative Education (ICE). We had then, as we do now, the same goals of spreading the joys of music and technology far across the land. That will never change.

And now you know our secret origin story. Things will never be the same.

Photos by Eric Humphrey and Pia Blumenthal.

Credits:

  • Editing and Music by Langdon Crawford
  • Produced with support from The National Science Foundation