Voltage Regulators: An Introduction

We finish off our Introduction to Electronic Components series with the voltage regulator, which is a useful little thing. Sometimes, you have more voltage than you need—say, when you’re working with a 9 volt battery but you need 5 volts for your circuit. Also, if your project is especially finicky, they can also take in a fluctuating amount of voltage and emit a perfectly constant value.

If you’re looking for more about other components (say…diodes, buttons and switches, resistors, etc etc) check out the whole playlist!

 

Home Foley Experiment Part 2: Revenge of the Foley Experiment!

Wait…there was a part 1?

That’s right, we’re finally posting the second part of our at-home Foley extravaganza! Last Thanksgiving we put together a Very Special Episode about a Foley fight scene. Later, we returned to the subject and created dinosaur chomps out of that same sound! Of course Ronny crunching on some celery doesn’t have quite the same menacing quality that an on-screen, cretaceous bringer of doom and death properly deserves, so we’ll show you how to make your dino crunches sound big and scary.

 

Oh and since this video our friend has seen the error of his innocent finger-attacking ways and now lives peacefully in the NYU Studios.

a t rex named foley

Draw MIDI: A DIY Paper Circuit Project

Update: Alex won first place in NYU Music Technology’s 2014 product design competition!                       Congrats!

 

Today’s Project: Draw MIDI

(Production: Ronny Mraz, Adam November, and Kathleen “Ying-Ying” Zhang, full credits at Youtube)

A digital-based project, Alex Haff’s Draw MIDI uses capacitance sensing to collect electrical signal from a pencil-and-paper keyboard, converts that to MIDI using an Arduino, and then sends the code into your computer via a Max patch. That may sound complicated, but it’s quite simple once you understand the function of each part of the project.

System Requirements and Code

While this project can technically be done on Windows, it takes a bit of finagling. We recommend Mac OSX.

Because Draw MIDI is a digital project, you’ll also need some code. For this project, Alex used both an Arduino sketch and a Max patch. You can find each of them here and here.

The Arduino code will run in the controller’s software on your computer. The Max patch will need to be run in Max. If you don’t own Max, never fear. You can copy and paste the code into Max’s free runtime application.

Step-by-Step

NYU Music Technology is an active member of the Instructables.com community. As such, a step-by-step guide of building the project may be found here.

Edit: Thanks for the feature, Instructables!

We had a lot of fun with this week’s project and hope you will, too! A special thanks to Langdon Crawford for cleaning up and hosting the code.

Draw MIDIPaper Circuits

Paper circuits have been making their way around the tech world because their low-cost components give them great potential for cheap mass production. For DIY, they offer similar affordability, a great availability of materials, and they’re just plain fun. There’s a novelty in creating something interactive from ink and graphite. Usually, our words and drawings can’t fly off the page, but with the addition of electronics they can light up or be heard.

For an industry application of paper circuits, watch our talk with educator Alex Ruthmann.

For some inspiration, check out this Ted Talk, “DJ Decks Made of Paper” by Kate Stone.

And for some great, simple projects the Exploratorium’s Tinkering Studio has you covered.

 

The Science of Bass Drops!

Video

Edit April 3, 2014: Hey everyone! Hope no one minded our little April Fool’s joke. That said, we’d love to actually make this video. Who wants to do some research? (We do.)

In this video, we explore the science behind bass drops. Why are bass drops so popular in electronic music? Are we responding to pitch the same way cognitively as we do to dynamics? Join us as we explore just why bass drops are so popular. Is it the tension and release? Does it cognitively have to do with the way the pitch drops? Are we, in fact, evolutionarily inclined to love the bass? Or, at least, to respond to it.This video is best listened to on Beats headphones or the phattest sub you own. Please don’t use your Macbook speakers.

 

A shout out to producer Evan Scott for providing the music for this week’s episode. https://soundcloud.com/evanscottproducer

The Science of Wikidrummer

Video

We’re back from spring break with a new video!

Drummer Julien Audigier and Audio Zéro put together the Wikidrummer video, an exploration of different environments and the effect these spaces had on drum sounds.

In this video, we break down the science behind why all of these spaces sound different. We’ll also show you our own reverb experiment, and how you can incorporate physical spaces into your music, even if it was recorded somewhere else.

Where Music, Education, and Technology Collide

We at the Science of Music are firmly perched on the intersection between music and technology, but we’re at a few other crossroads as well.

With technology changing the way we look at art (and vice versa) it’s only to be expected that it’s changing the way we look at education. We, in particular, are especially interested in the way technology is reshaping how we think of music education.

A new edition to NYU’s faculty in 2013, Alex Ruthmann also serves as the President of the Association of Technology in Music Education. We’re happy to have him at NYU, and especially happy to talk with him about the future of music education, why people should learn music, and what it means to be both an innovator and an educator. For more from Alex, you can find him on Twitter as @alexruthmann or visit him at his website.

Analog Vs. Digital: The Age-Old Question

Video

Can you really hear a difference between analog and digital recording? What about in synthesis? In a personified rap battle between analog and digital, who would win?

NYU students, having nothing better to do at our ivory tower of academia (I mean, it’s not like we live in one of America’s biggest commercial and cultural centers or anything) love contemplating age-old questions such as these. You may remember some freshmen who previously did ponder whether was better to auto-tune or to not auto-tune. And while these questions may prove inconclusive, the best part is, as always, in the debate.

 

 

So our freshmen rose to the occasion once again to bring forth this rousing performance; a call to arms for their fellow rap battlers. And a cry heard throughout the land did ring: Who won? Who lost? You decide!*

*No seriously, leave a comment below.