DIY: Build Your Own Microphone!

This how-to video explains the process of building a dynamic microphone (which, incidentally, can also be used as a loud speaker) from a cup! This rudimentary audio transducer could be used as a quick project for a physics class exploring electromagnetism or an audio technology class exploring transduction. Or you could do it just for kicks.

The fidelity of the completed project is not studio quality (if it was our lives would be a whole lot cheaper), but it’s cool. And on the upside you don’t have to have an EE degree to build it.

Credits:

  • Written and Directed by Travis Kaufman and Nick Dooley
  • Produced with support from The National Science Foundation
Advertisements

Can Speakers be Used as Microphones?

A door once opened can be stepped through in either direction…

Okay, we promise that we’re serious people when we’re not making Doctor Who references (but we are never not making Doctor Who references so…paradox?). This video shows how a speaker, once removed from its enclosure, can be used as either a speaker or a microphone, thus exhibiting the beauty of transduction! Specifically, this is a good example of how electromagnetic transduction can work in both directions (electrical to acoustic transduction and acoustic to electrical).

Credits:

  • Directed by: Langdon Crawford
  • Voice:  Tyler Mayo
  • Editing Caitlin Gambill

Introduction to Transduction

Simply put, transduction is the process of converting one type of energy to another. For audio-specific purposes, if you’ve ever used a microphone or a speaker to record or amplify a sound, you’ve seen transduction in action.

A microphone works as a transducer by changing acoustic waves to electrical waves.  And a loudspeaker is also a transducer, even though it does the opposite: by changing electrical waves to acoustic waves.

Check out the video below for more:

Credits: